CATERPILLAR ARTIST OF THE WEEK - Mielle Harvey

Mielle Harvey, a New England born artist, jeweler, and sculptor, draws her inspiration from nature, but not always in the way we are used to. Harvey often depicts and celebrates the "harsh realities" inherent in the natural world and the struggle to survive, and finds beauty not just in what is conventionally pretty, but in some of the most intimate, complex, and at times unsettling of interactions. "...nature, with its beauty and harsh realities, provides the inspiration for my work. By combining elements and sometimes materials which both attract and repulse, I aim to challenge the viewer to question the traditional values associated with beauty and adornment.” - Mielle Harvey (www.mielleh

Inchworm moths

Behold! Inchworm moths in all their glory! The diverse and wonderful moths of the family Geometridae are all too often written-off as commonplace, dingy, even boring, but this is far, FAR, from the truth of things. The nightly fluttering of scaled wings around a porch light may, at first glance, appear to only offer up mundane, nondescript little things. But a closer look is alway warranted. A closer look almost universally reveals creatures with the most beautiful, intricate patterning, flushes of unexpected color, blooms of tufted scales and curling hair, and elegance and apparent personality that would remain hidden, secret, from those who only afford them a casual glance. This slideshow

The Prominents, family Notodontidae

With their inflatable tails, horns and fins, acid sprays, bulbous rear-ends, and unmatched mimicry, the Notodontid caterpillars are some of the most bizarre creatures we work with, and though their adult counterparts may lack the shear number of odd bells and whistles that their larvae display, they are non-the-less a very charming group of insects. From Clostera moths with tufted butt-chimneys, to snapped-branch twig mimics like the Oakworm moths, to fluff balls like the Gluphisia, under close inspection these hold all the beauty, wonder, and down-right adorability as any of the larger, more often recognized groups. I hope you enjoy getting to know these remarkable creatures! By popular dem

The Saturniid Giant Silk Moths

These are the "divas" of the moth world. From the Cecropia, our largest flying insect, to the diminutive but very fluffy Rosy Maple Moth, each one is a memory from childhood, a discovery that leaves us breathless. How do you think these compare to the much more often celebrated butterflies? By popular demand, we will be adding adult moth image panels to our traveling "The Caterpillar Lab" exhibits in 2017. I resisted doing this for a long time for a few reasons. I wanted to specifically highlight the caterpillars as important and interesting organisms, independent of their adult counterparts, and I felt that showing the adults could take away from this message. I also wanted to show adult mo

Eyed sphinx moths

Native New England Moths: Eyed sphinx moths in the subfamily Smerinthinae. Most of these images show the moths in their full eyes-wide defense display. When resting they fold their leaf-like wings over the bright eyespots, and are camouflaged to perfection. Can you believe these incredible moths are flying around YOUR woods at night? By popular demand, we will be adding adult moth image panels to our traveling "The Caterpillar Lab" exhibits in 2017. I resisted doing this for a long time for a few reasons. I wanted to specifically highlight the caterpillars as important and interesting organisms, independent of their adult counterparts, and I felt that showing the adults could take away from

Three Emeralds and The Bad-Wing

Native New England Moths: Three Emeralds and The Bad-Wing. The Luna moth isn't our only luminous green, breathtaking moth. These small geometrids can be just as spectacular but require a closer look! By popular demand, we will be adding adult moth image panels to our traveling "The Caterpillar Lab" exhibits in 2017. I resisted doing this for a long time for a few reasons. I wanted to specifically highlight the caterpillars as important and interesting organisms, independent of their adult counterparts, and I felt that showing the adults could take away from this message. I also wanted to show adult moths and butterflies as more than just a pair of pretty wings. Much of the photography availa

Native New England Moths

Native New England Moths: Plagodis species, a genus of spectacular geometrid inchworm moths that can be common at back-porch lights! By popular demand, we will be adding adult moth image panels to our traveling "The Caterpillar Lab" exhibits in 2017. I resisted doing this for a long time for a few reasons. I wanted to specifically highlight the caterpillars as important and interesting organisms, independent of their adult counterparts, and I felt that showing the adults could take away from this message. I also wanted to show adult moths and butterflies as more than just a pair of pretty wings. Much of the photography available was of flat dorsal shots of the spread wings, with little or no

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The Caterpillar Lab fosters greater appreciation and care for the complexity and beauty of our local natural history through live caterpillar educational programs, research initiatives, and photography and film projects. We believe that an increased awareness of one’s local environment is the foundation on which healthy and responsible attitudes towards the broader natural systems of this world is built.

© 2015 CATERPILLAR LAB INC.  With original artwork by Heather Reid and Samuel Jaffe

 

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